Quickstart

Note

All code starting with a $ is meant to run on your terminal. All code starting with a >>> is meant to run in a python interpreter, like ipython.

Installation

Web3.py can be installed (preferably in a virtualenv) using pip as follows:

$ pip install web3

Note

If you run into problems during installation, you might have a broken environment. See the troubleshooting guide to Set up a clean environment.

Installation from source can be done from the root of the project with the following command.

$ pip install .

Using Web3

To use the web3 library you will need to initialize the Web3 class.

Use the auto module to guess at common node connection options.

>>> from web3.auto import w3
>>> w3.eth.blockNumber
4000000

This w3 instance will now allow you to interact with the Ethereum blockchain.

Note

If you get the result UnhandledRequest: No providers responded to the RPC request then you are not connected to a node. See Why do I need to connect to a node? and Choosing How to Connect to Your Node

Getting Blockchain Info

It’s time to start using Web3.py! Try getting all the information about the latest block.

>>> w3.eth.getBlock('latest')
{'difficulty': 1,
 'gasLimit': 6283185,
 'gasUsed': 0,
 'hash': HexBytes('0x53b983fe73e16f6ed8178f6c0e0b91f23dc9dad4cb30d0831f178291ffeb8750'),
 'logsBloom': HexBytes('0x00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000'),
 'miner': '0x0000000000000000000000000000000000000000',
 'mixHash': HexBytes('0x0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000'),
 'nonce': HexBytes('0x0000000000000000'),
 'number': 0,
 'parentHash': HexBytes('0x0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000'),
 'proofOfAuthorityData': HexBytes('0x0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000dddc391ab2bf6701c74d0c8698c2e13355b2e4150000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000'),
 'receiptsRoot': HexBytes('0x56e81f171bcc55a6ff8345e692c0f86e5b48e01b996cadc001622fb5e363b421'),
 'sha3Uncles': HexBytes('0x1dcc4de8dec75d7aab85b567b6ccd41ad312451b948a7413f0a142fd40d49347'),
 'size': 622,
 'stateRoot': HexBytes('0x1f5e460eb84dc0606ab74189dbcfe617300549f8f4778c3c9081c119b5b5d1c1'),
 'timestamp': 0,
 'totalDifficulty': 1,
 'transactions': [],
 'transactionsRoot': HexBytes('0x56e81f171bcc55a6ff8345e692c0f86e5b48e01b996cadc001622fb5e363b421'),
 'uncles': []}

Many of the typical things you’ll want to do will be in the w3.eth API, so that is a good place to start.

If you want to dive straight into contracts, check out the section on Contracts, including a Contract Deployment Example, and how to create a contract instance using w3.eth.contract().

Note

It is recommended that your development environment have the PYTHONWARNINGS=default environment variable set. Some deprecation warnings will not show up without this variable being set.